Technology Tips from the CTL

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Starting this month, we’ll be sharing tech tips from our CTL Technology Consultants. At Mott’s Center for Teaching & Learning, we host between 1-3 faculty each semester who are here to support their fellow faculty and staff with technology that can be useful to improving their productivity and effectiveness in the classroom and around campus. The post that follows below is the first in this series.

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From Paula Harris, CTL Tech Consultant and Nursing faculty:

Create a Signature Electronically to be used to sign Electronic Documents

Have you ever been asked to sign an electronic document (such as a pdf or doc) with your signature? If so, this Wired Wednesday is for you! There are a couple of ways that you can place your signature into an electronic document. You can create an electronic signature, save it to your computer, and then copy it into electronic documents. You can also use Adobe Acrobat Pro to include your signature in pdf documents electronically. I have developed step-by-step instructions to show you how to use both of these options.

  • Sign a piece of paper
  • Scan the signature, using your departmental copier, and email it to yourself
  • Save the document
  • Click on the “Snipping Tool” located in your Mott computer apps or a similar app on your PC (This snipping tool can be used to capture any screen image).
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  • Note: On a Mac, you would use Cmd+Shift+4 and then draw a marquee over the item you want.
  • Once the Snipping Tool is opened, click on the down arrow next to “New.”
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  • Choose the type of snip you want:
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  • Then click on the area surrounding your signature by holding down the left side of the mouse and dragging the box to capture the image.
  • Save your signature to your computer, by clicking on “File” and choosing “Save As”. Files can be saved as PNG, GIF files, JPEG, or single file HTML. You can also right click on your image and copy it. This will allow you to place it immediately into your electronic document.

How to Sign a pdf Document

If you have Windows 8 on your Mott computer, you have access to the Adobe Acrobat XL Pro.

  • Open the pdf document you need to sign.
  • Click on the “Fill & Sign Tools” located at the upper right hand area of the screen.
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  • Then click on “Place Signature”. You will then have the opportunity choose how you want to create your signature. Simply click on the radial button next to the option you want to use. Yo will have a chance to review your signature and then accept the one you like.
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  • After you click on accept, click on the pdf document where you would like to place the signature. The size of the signature can be altered by clicking on the corners of the text box by holding down on the left side of the mouse and dragging the corner until you reach the appropriate size.
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  • Save your changes and you are good to go!

Mott CTL Tech, Paula Harris, and the Multigenerational Classroom

Community Colleges are known for enrolling a wide range of demographics within their student body. This creates further challenges to faculty as we try to engage learners with a broader range of experiences in technology. In an article titled “Video: The Answer to Your Multigenerational Classroom,” Paula Harris, Mott’s CTL Technology Consultant and Associate Professor of Nursing, begins to address this question.

Screen Shot 2016-04-04 at 3.07.13 PMRead the full article here in the special technology supplement to the March 21st issue of Community College Week.

Quick Takes

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Here are a few posts from other publications worth a quick read.

Too much email? Get a quick take on how to manage it from Profhacker at the Chronicle for Higher Education in their blog When We Should Reply to Email

But maybe you are interested in some distractions to break up your day. Here are some interactive cats for your entertainment. Check out Digital Distractions: Interactive Cats.

Do you need some more creative distractions that could help spark new ideas? Check out this story and video shared by Core77 on the fine craft of paper marbling.

Reflections on Dream 2016

 

hope_graphicLate last month, more than 2000 people descended upon Atlanta’s Hyatt Regency for the Dream 2016 conference, a forum where community college educators, administrators, researchers, policy-makers, and thought-leaders come together to share in the conversation that began with the Achieving the Dream movement. To say it was an inspirational event would be an understatement. For colleagues who have attended this in prior years, they warned me that it would be informative, overwhelming and inspiring. I was not disappointed. If there was ever a place where one felt part of a much larger mission, one that existed to help better mankind through the education of some of our most vulnerable and under-served populations, this was it.

Our learning lies in the telling of our stories.
~ David Price, Open: How we will work, live and learn in the future (quoted at Dream 2016)

Digesting it all has taken awhile. Like most of you, I’m sure, when you return from an academic conference that hits in the middle of a busy semester, you are running from the moment you return, catching up with all the important emails that required a more thoughtful response, answering questions and reviewing student assignments (if you also teach, as I do), refocusing on the backlog of reading needed for the next committee meeting. It can seem like a lifetime ago when you were there, among all those people who shared an excited commitment to the mission at hand.

Expand knowledge beyond the shores of wonder…
~ heard during one of the sessions, Dream 2016

And then you realize it… at least I did…that I was DOING the work that we were all talking about. As I would occasionally fall into the haze of recovery from travel or just plain mid-semester overload – you know, that feeling where you know there is something you should be doing but your brain is stuck in neutral – it would dawn on me as my next move was decided, that I was framing my responses in light of the lessons I’d learned from the many presentations I had attended at the Dream conference.

Transformative change requires three kinds of change at the same time: Structural, Process, and Attitudinal. And it must happen on multiple levels.
~ notes from presentation on iPASS, Dream 2016

Panicky students sent emails about assignments after two snow days fell on two consecutive Wednesdays that was then followed by Spring break. Taking a deep breath, I reflected upon the best way to diffuse their panic while making the best of the learning objectives for the course.

[We are] not just a community college, but THE COMMUNITY’s college.
~ Jim Jacobs, president, Macomb Community College, heard at Dream 2016

Over the next 10 days, I responded and reviewed and reassured students. I sent out pro-active emails and announcements from Blackboard. I offered to meet with students outside of class. I offered to look over their work in progress and provide feedback. And, for the most part, it seemed to work. About 1/3 of the class was ready with the several assignments that were due. And another third was nearly ready.

It’s important to remember the stories. People will forget the numbers (data). But they will not forget the stories. History can promote thought. But…humanity promotes action.
~ Wes Moore, author, speaking at Dream 2016

There were still those students who could not complete their goals to catch up over the Spring break in spite of the availability of technology to work on assignments, in spite of my availability to help guide them. There were other factors that challenged them – those life issues faced by many of our community college students that we often talk about. But we made a pact and set some new goals together, including new deadlines with high expectations while not leading these students out the door. I believe in them and let them know it. I believe each and every student can succeed to the best of their ability and potential. And I share that with them, too, so that they can begin to believe in themselves.

Change your lens…by addressing each student as a Dream Scholar.
~ Tamika Narvaez-Payne, Dream Scholar student from Bakersfield College

Hope is a powerful tool.

Technology and its Softer side to Learning

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Much has been written on the topic of incorporating technology into the classroom, all in the name of increasing student success through increased engagement. Technology has been an important factor in the concept of the flipped classroom and “teaching naked” (José Bowen) where the students are responsible for viewing lectures and doing the readings beforehand so that the classroom can become more activity-focused and engaging.

It has been an established part of online learning where both access to, and preparation for, the use of technology is critical to learning and participation in this digital environment, especially as a way of reducing the distance between students – each other or between them and the faculty. The results are mixed with many claiming that MOOCs are the new egalitarian education. But the results are mixed, especially when applying this to credit-bearing courses. The engagement of both learner and educator become critical and results often depend upon the increased fortitude from highly prepared students and faculty who are both committed to successful completion.

But technology can also play an important pedagogical role in the area of personal narratives as a tool for increased student engagement. Digital storytelling is the subject of a brief guide published by Educause that provides some food for thought on how to incorporate the digital medium effectively and accessibly without requiring a high mastery of advanced digital tools. Today, students and faculty have access to a digital movie studio in their telephones, and can easily edit on mobile devices or their desktop and save it in a format that can be viewed for free online.

The goal, however, is not just to create another way to utilize technology in the classroom. The real objective is to instill passion in the topic leading to the successful achievement in the learning outcome. Humans are natural storytellers. We can ask students to incorporate research and resources into their projects. But by also allowing them to make it personal, they become more engaged. This becomes not just something they have to study, but something they are immediately making relevant to their own worlds.

Ken Bain, author of What the Best College Teachers Do, would call this deeper learning, something that may be achieved through a series of “goal-based scenarios.” His follow-up book What the Best College Students do addresses the passion that students can find within to motivate their own learning. Hear Ken Bain in this recent NPR interview from May 2015.

What does all this have in common? It is the combination of inspiring student passion and the ability to express a personal connection to the material that creates passion for learning. This makes digital storytelling a powerful tool for student engagement that can be applied within any discipline we teach. To learn more, follow some of the links provided above and discover more ways to be inspired to apply this in your own classroom!

Loving the hustle and bustle of a new academic year!

Info_Channel-02I don’t know about you, but even though classes don’t officially start until next Tuesday, 9/8/15, at Mott, things are really hopping here on campus. It’s Kick-Off Week at the college, and faculty who have been away doing whatever it is faculty do (which – believe it or not – is a lot!) are converging on campus to celebrate the start of the new academic year. Although it has its moments of stress as things gear up, I love all the new energy bubbling around campus!

Our campus has been very busy with a number of initiatives over the summer, many of which have involved faculty in the development of Guided Pathways. If you’re not familiar with this topic, here’s the short version: Guided Pathways involves a multi-faceted approach to helping more students graduate, but beginning with the development of clear, semester-by-semester outlines of how to move through an occupational program or transfer discipline. To support this, other areas of student support are addressed including intake, orientation, advising, etc. It is an effort to use best practices supported by data to lay a strong foundation for success as students enter, progress, and complete their time at the community college, culminating in a degree or certificate. Some background reading can be found here and here, lead by Rob Johnstone and Davis Jenkins who are considered among the leaders in this movement.

Another big project was taken on by myself and a colleague, Jim Shurter, far outside of our regular duties, in the form of a marketing campaign for the college. “Mott. My Path to Excellence.” – The tagline and campaign aimed to reposition our college as a “first choice” in the Greater Flint area and surrounding counties, and not simply a more affordable one. We used the voice of millennials to speak for what they wanted from an education, and how they wanted to shape it for themselves. The inference here is that Mott can not only help make that happen, but by choosing Mott over, say, a “name” university, we have redefined the community college as a truly valuable option that is on par with their other choices. We are empowering these potential students to say that Mott really IS their path to excellence!

Now… for some of you, it may have occurred to you that these two initiatives are at odds with each other. Why would we create Guided Pathways that seem to “remove” choice, and then seemingly try to entice students to Mott as a way of shaping their own choices in education? Believe it or not, it makes sense when you look at how many of our students want those choices in the specific educational program they’re choosing to be determined. Today’s students, according to the research by Jenkins, et al, want a more defined path to get them to their destination. But these pathways are not rigid and inflexible. When it comes to non-CTE programs, they are simply a guide to help make the most of their brief time here before transferring to a university. The other part of the Guided Pathways Initiative depends heavily on advising and a case management system that would involve faculty and others in working with students to help guide them towards their goals. In this way, exploration is still possible for the student who wants to veer off the proscribed path.

As for the campaign itself, it seems to have touched the audience effectively. Rather than the 7% drop in Fall enrollment that was originally anticipated, we are currently hovering at around 3% above last year’s Fall numbers. I’ve run into many new students in the out-county areas where we were especially focused who – once they learned I worked at Mott – have proudly announced to me that they were starting there in the Fall. It was exciting to hear!

Now, as we launch the new academic year, I see our CTL as playing a vital role in helping our college employees help support that message that we are all here to help students make their future possible!

To our Mott employees, alumni, and students, be sure to share your story using our hashtag – #mott4me!

Here’s to a great semester for everyone!

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Good Reads on Community Colleges

Diversifying the student body is on the academic radar when examining the student population at colleges and universities across the nation. But diversity is not just about race. It involves the whole sector of students we see on the campuses of community colleges across the nation.

These students may include ones who are first generation college students, ones who dropped out or were not encouraged to continue their education beyond high school. It includes students who come from poverty, crime-ridden urban areas, or depressed rural spaces. It may include working adults returning to school to try and improve their income potential, a stay-at-home mother who needed to develop job skills to return to the workforce, or the factory worker whose job was outsourced to China. And it also includes students whose parents may be concerned about their child’s ability to stand up on their own far from the family support system. Whatever the reason that brings a student here, community colleges provide educational opportunities for some of the most diverse learners in higher education.

With that in mind, three recent articles are worthy of your attention and are shared with you here.

Why Elite Institutions Need to Welcome Students From Community Colleges

This is an opinion piece written by Laura Huober who made the auspicious transfer from Santa Monica (Community) College to Amherst College, an elite private liberal arts college. Her story demonstrates how, with the right supports, community college transfer students not only can thrive, they can make a valuable contribution to the learning environment.

The Challenge of the First-Generation Student

In this article, the First Generation student includes many who are also first generation Americans, as well as the first in their families to go to college. The article examines the tension regarding the stories of first-generation students who reach elite institutions, and the majority who are served by community colleges.

When elite institutions like Smith, Amherst College, or Harvard University enroll significant numbers of first-generation students, their stories are often splashed across the news. But regional state universities and community colleges have been identifying and supporting these students for decades, through federal TRIO programs, a collection of outreach and student-services efforts geared toward low-income students.”

Looking Beyond the Data to Help Students Succeed

In this article, Katherine Mangan addresses one of the hottest topics at the American Association of Community Colleges annual convention held this week – predictive analytics and retention strategies. What makes this article a good read is the recognition that numbers alone don’t tell us what to do and are only part of the equation on predicting success. Examining best practices, reinventing success strategies to work with our community college student demographics, and implementing them in a thoughtful way – these all help frame data as a reference tool to inform the choices made on how to support students. Those choices may include mentoring, i.e. creating a social connection to help support the student, addressing grit and other noncognitive traits that can make or break a student’s ability to succeed. Tools such as SuccessNavigator can help identify the characteristics that can undermine a student as they manage the intricate balance of academics and life.